51

(1 replies, posted in TheNextBigWriter Premium)

Hello,

What's the best way to post a chapter from scrivener?

Thanks

52

(13 replies, posted in TheNextBigWriter Premium)

This is likely a PICNIC problem. I'll do this again and check.  Thanks

53

(7 replies, posted in Fantasy, Magic, and Sci-fi)

Hey all, how are you all?

I've been AWOL for a while. I've just finished a fun, lighthearted YA novel, plenty on fantasy and sci fi elements.
I'm unsure if this group is the best place to try and get on board with it. What i mean is, I know most of you ladies and laddets are seasoned writers and i feel my work may be too low brow.
Would you suggest trying the YA group?
Totally not offended if you send me packing.

Thanks

54

(9 replies, posted in Fantasy, Magic, and Sci-fi)

Happy Birthday...from a stranger.

55

(13 replies, posted in TheNextBigWriter Premium)

I used the in-line review for the first time. Pretty good, I like it. But...about half way through I saved my review to have dinner, cam back...could not open it. click click bloody click click, clickity click click. Hee haw. Had to start again.
So does anyone know why? Sarcastic responses welcome.

56

(296 replies, posted in TheNextBigWriter Premium)

Hi C Lee.  I'm just back on too.
Looking to workshop a YA fantasy novel. Ideally I'd like like-minded writers in this genera.
I'm looking to commit to at least 4 to 5 visits a weeks too. I've got my reviewing head on and ideally newly posted work would suit, but not absolute.

57

(3 replies, posted in TheNextBigWriter Premium)

Thanks guys n gals.

58

(1 replies, posted in Je Suis CHARLIE)

So clever, and yes, sad.

59

(3 replies, posted in TheNextBigWriter Premium)

Hi all,  (Sorry if this the wrong place to post this.)
I'm a lapsed member.
I've not stopped writing, just found it easier to go away write my latest novel then return to  workshop it. This way I can devote my full attention to reviewing others work as well as editing my own work.
So now I've gotta learn to navigate this amazing new site.
As my previous novel was my first, I made plenty mistakes both technically, e.g. lack of planning, structure etc, as well my understanding of basic fundamentals of writing paragraphs, sentences and good dialogue. So I parked that one, (I'm still very keen to return.)and started anew.   
So I've written a YA novel. It's humorous and is a cross between sci-fi and fantasy.
I'd like to get on board with like minded writers, so keen to find the right bunch to work with. Suggestions welcome and I'll keep looking tonight.
But great to be back, looking forward to chatting to you all.
David
I look forward

Hi stranger, well done you. Not at all surprised.
Yes I'm back in the saddle so to speak.

Hello you lovely writers, how are you all?

I have a few weeks free early December this year, my family is off to Scotland yet I can't be bothered.
I'm at that age now where once I might have thought, "Way hey, party, pubs and loud music," but now I'm thinking, "writing, writing and more of the same." Peace n quiet to work harder on my writing sounds like bliss. But then I had a thought, I could attend a writing camp thingy and hone my poor skills, like that namo-neno-namo...whajah ma call it. Is their any ones in the dear old U.S of A in December?

If anyone knows of one please advise?

Cheers


D A Reynolds

Hi Norm,  sorry it it's too late to be of use, but...there is a member called Annelie Weinberg. She's a geneticist and a Professor to boot. She was an advisor to the European parliament too. Maybe you know her from Facebook? I'm an avid fan of genetics and did research it for one of my books. However...sometimes science does not have all the answers, e.g. an experiment was run where rats who ran a maze with parts that were electrified, consequently their off spring were significantly better than their parents at the maze; avoiding the electrified parts much better. The point is, I was told that DNA never passes on memories but this experiment ran counter to that. So what I'm saying is, there is loads of Grey areas so use your poetic license.  Good luck.

Dave

Hi Norm,  sorry it it's too late to be of use, but...there is a member called Annelie Weinberg. She's a geneticist and a Professor to boot. She was an advisor to the European parliament too. Maybe you know her from Facebook? I'm an avid fan genetics and did research it for one of my books. However...sometimes science does not have all the answers, e.g. an experiment was run where rats who ran a maze with parts that were electrified, consequently their off spring were significantly better than their parents at the maze; avoiding the electrified parts much better. The point is, I was told that DNA never passes on memories but this experiment ran counter to that. So what I'm saying is their is loads of grey areas so use your poetic licence.  Good luck.

Dave

64

(16 replies, posted in TheNextBigWriter Premium)

Congrats to all that entered and to the finalists.

65

(6 replies, posted in Writing Tips & Site Help)

Thanks Cobber, Tom.

Tom, if you had had no issue with the plagiarism, what were your thoughts on it, would it be worth the money?

66

(6 replies, posted in Writing Tips & Site Help)

I've no doubt there are previous posts on this subject but after several minutes, (okay maybe several seconds.) of searching I thought I'd take the easiest route.
I'm nearly at a milestone for me, which is I'm pretty much finished my first (on second attempt.) novel. I want to run it through grammar checkers for the usual mistakes before grinding the chapters through TNBW. You know the usual suspects? Over use of words, too long a sentence etc. So I've been looking into the best ones out there.  See here for reviews:    http://writing-enhancement-software-rev … eview.html       

I've settled on two candidates:-

1. Whitesmoke.    http://www.whitesmoke.com

2. Grammarly Premium   https://nspl.grammarly.com

The reviews for both are great so I can't decide what one to chose. Does anyone have either of these, opinions please?

Thanks

David

67

(48 replies, posted in New Members)

Hi all, Although I've been a member of TNBW for a few years, I have made all the classic mistakes that newbie writers do. Which I will point out, but I do want to say that TNBW is a brilliant tool for any new or seasoned writer. My mistakes were:-

1.  No outline drawn up of the complete story.
This meant once I was so far in I started to get lost, and or had to go back and re-write the start due to changes further on. Wow, this can            eat up a lot of time and can cause one to become disheartened.

2. I started to post my chapters on the TNBW too early and in wrong area.
For a seasoned writer this is fine as they likely to be better organized. The issues for me were that people with no interest in my genre, (Sci-fi YA) were reviewing it. This led to some silly questions like "What's a time gate matrix?" That's like reading a Star Trek novel and asking "What's a Dilythium Chrystal?" Sometimes in Sci-Fi you just have to bring your imagination along. Often I would get critiques that was diametrically opposed. I started to drown in suggestions and self-doubt.  (There are some members, not many, who just want to do the bare minimum with reviewing just to get the points. You will know them when you see them, as you will likely read their review of your work and you will hear yourself say, "WTF was that?"

3.  For my first novel I only used MS Word to write, big mistake for me.
I now use a writing app called Scrivener. Bloody brilliant for organising chapters, characters and places as well as popping in notes or colour schemes to create a visual overview.

In the end I pushed my novel away and started a new one and have not put anything on TNBW, yet. As I find staying organised hard this is working for me, you may be different. I'm about to buy editing software, maybe Whitesmoke or Grammerly Premium to tidy it up. This is mainly for word over use and overly long sentences but not as the final answer. I just want to remove as much distractions as I can so once it's posted on here, the reviewer can concentrate on reviewing the story and it's structure rather than poor grammer etc. I must point out I had not written a thing since I was at college in 1989 and I have a form of dyslexia.

So when you start to review others work, chose carefully as they will feel obliged (rightly so) to review your work. I recall gulping with nerves at the thought of writing reviews of seasoned writers work. What the hell did I have to offer? Well quite a lot, firstly an opinion of the story line. An opinion is an opinion. I did have an eye for consistencies and incontinences. And if a sentence or paragraph trips you up, tell them.

I look forward to meeting you all, metaphorically, on here.

Dave R

68

(3 replies, posted in TheNextBigWriter Premium)

Me picketh my jaweth up in amazment...eth, not in OSC's good taste, but just in such a wonderful compliment. Great news Bonnie.

Yes, I think it would be too difficult to administer a young section, and Janet is correct, parents should take the lead on providing support at such a young age. A separate junior TNBW might work, (say 14 and above) if well thought out.

Thanks all.

Food for thought here.
Yes, Nik and Mrs P, I think young minds need to be protected from ill thought out critique. Perhaps if any potential TNBW Jr section was moderated by approved persons and that all critique was managed, buffered to be delivered to the young writer in such a way that it could only help and encourage.
Mrs P, I know what you mean about harsh critique. I as a newbie to writing, have been floored by severe reviews. It's weird when you are receiving positive critique, that on the whole is very good, being both helpful and also encouraging; t hen there is that one twenty that cuts you.

As my latest book nears completion I'm steeling myself to once-more start publishing my chapters. Unlike my previous attempt, where I found the cycle of reviewing others and being critiqued to be difficult to juggle, this time I'm waiting till I have a first draft.

Thanks all.

Hi,
I know a young writer who could do with the right type of support, I obviously pondered the idea of mentioning this site, however I'm not too sure if it's a bit too mature for him.

Thoughts?

David

72

(8 replies, posted in TheNextBigWriter Basic)

A hyphen helps, Crapa-strophic. Now't rong with made up words, adds some zing to the munch.

David

73

(19 replies, posted in TheNextBigWriter Premium)

Hello Max, hope your on the mend.
Wow, 10 hours, no chance of that with me.
Recently I have had the good luck to be posted to a new customer at work; meaning I now have more free time at this customers site. I bring my own laptop in, and can now sneak the odd hour or two to work on my current book.
But man o man, 10 hours, thats superman stuff. My brain gets in a kerfuffle after two hours, then i have to walk away for a break.

Dave

74

(2 replies, posted in TheNextBigWriter Premium)

SolN wrote:

Something happened on the site. I'm asking the tech folks now. I know there was an upgrade release planned for today. I see a few other problems. Sorry about that. Let me find out if the in-line is still there.

Sol

Perhaps, just as I do at work, when you carry out any upgrades, changes etc and it is to be at a specific, predetermined time then flick a notification/warning so users can avoid posting or editing for that short window. In this case perhaps a pop-up or banner on the site?

Thanks

David

Linda Lee wrote:
d a reynolds wrote:

Slightly off topic. Question:
How many member here actualy try to get their work published through the original method of sending hard copies; and or, sending a digital copy to a publishing house?

Lots, but I think more and more lately writers are leaning more heavily toward self-publish. I'm still working with an agent however because I'm very keen on the foreign market and movie rights which is very hard to do with self publishing unless you reach sales in the amaze-balls range.

Thanks Linda. I think I will, come the glorious day that I finish my book, look towards a publisher.