Topic: The horror & macabre genre

Your thoughts on this genre. please elucidate or equivocate or profounduate... feel free to make up words, as I often do.

Ghost stories

Gothic literature

Monster literature

Weird fiction

Macabre fiction & non-fiction

Morbid fiction & non-fiction

Cadaverous fiction & non-fiction

Zombie fiction

Vampire fiction

Dark fantasy

Psychological horror (my favorite)

Horror poetry

>>The Life Beyond
Written by: Rupert Brooke

He wakes, who never thought to wake again,
Who held the end was Death.
He opens eyes
Slowly, to one long livid oozing plain
Closed down by the strange eyeless heavens.
He lies;
And waits; and once in timeless sick surmise
Through the dead air heaves up an unknown hand,
Like a dry branch.
No life is in that land,
Himself not lives, but is a thing that cries;
An unmeaning point upon the mud; a speck
Of moveless horror; an Immortal One
Cleansed of the world, sentient and dead; a fly
Fast-stuck in grey sweat on a corpse's neck.

  I thought when love for you died, I should die.

It's dead.
Alone, most strangely, I live on.

Alone, most strangely, I live on.

2 (edited by John Hamler 2014-11-26 14:08:27)

Re: The horror & macabre genre

My father once gave me an HP Lovecraft anthology thing when I was a teenager. Told me it was supercool, superfreaky stuff. I didn't really appreciate it at the time, but I do now. Once you grasp and realize the utter insignificance of humanity vis-a-vis the universe, once you've come to that conclusion...  Well, then your imagination can really take wing. It's a cynical purview, but not entirely void of passion or joy. There are still plenty of thrills and yucks to be had. In fact, it's kinda like walking around, being Bill Murray. smile

Recently the HBO show True Detective revitalized the forgotten art of the turn of the century Gothic or Weird fiction genre with its arcane references to THE KING IN YELLOW -by Robert Chambers- and the fabled evil city of Carcosa. A kind of Hell in a cosmic/parallel dimensional sense, not a religious one:

Along the shore the cloud waves break,
The twin suns sink behind the lake,
The shadows lengthen
In Carcosa.
Strange is the night where black stars rise,
And strange moons circle through the skies,
But stranger still is
Lost Carcosa.
Songs that the Hyades shall sing,
Where flap the tatters of the King,
Must die unheard in
Dim Carcosa.
Song of my soul, my voice is dead,
Die thou, unsung, as tears unshed
Shall dry and die in
Lost Carcosa.

Rather along the same lines as your Rupert Brooke poem, no?

Cheers

John

Re: The horror & macabre genre

John Hamler wrote:

My father once gave me an HP Lovecraft anthology thing when I was a teenager. Told me it was supercool, superfreaky stuff. I didn't really appreciate it at the time, but I do now. Once you grasp and realize the utter insignificance of humanity vis-a-vis the universe, once you've come to that conclusion...  Well, then your imagination can really take wing. It's a cynical purview, but not entirely void of passion or joy. There are still plenty of thrills and yucks to be had. In fact, it's kinda like walking around, being Bill Murray. smile

Recently the HBO show True Detective revitalized the forgotten art of the turn of the century Gothic or Weird fiction genre with its arcane references to THE KING IN YELLOW -by Robert Chambers- and the fabled evil city of Carcosa. A kind of Hell in a cosmic/parallel dimensional sense, not a religious one:

Along the shore the cloud waves break,
The twin suns sink behind the lake,
The shadows lengthen
In Carcosa.
Strange is the night where black stars rise,
And strange moons circle through the skies,
But stranger still is
Lost Carcosa.
Songs that the Hyades shall sing,
Where flap the tatters of the King,
Must die unheard in
Dim Carcosa.
Song of my soul, my voice is dead,
Die thou, unsung, as tears unshed
Shall dry and die in
Lost Carcosa.

Rather along the same lines as your Rupert Brooke poem, no?

Cheers

John

ALOHA  John,
Love the first line of the poem. Life, so magnificent, and yet so, so nothing... in the big, BIG scheme of things and life forms. I give a lot of thought to death now, having come so close to it over the last three years (autonomic hyperreflexia!, AH!... twice! and states of physical being that I would not wish on any living creature.).

To see stars, when dizzy; what is that vision? Well, I'm not sure, but I saw the universe of all universes, just before I fainted... and I'll never forget that hallucination!!! As I hallucinated this spinning ginormous universe in my brain, I also heard words not too unlike this poem. And while I saw my dying universe of syncope, I asked myself... is this what dying is all about? Am I now dying?

In fear and terror I screamed out for my wife to call an ambulance... and this saved my life. I was heard, not unheard... not lost in Lost Carcosa, or Costa Bravo or Costa Mesa (lol).

And after this hallucination (and a week in the hospital), I was no longer a virgin in life, sheltered from the reality of death... death will screw with a person, in disease, in mental aberrations that can send chills up and down the spine... ah, the spine, it is really a big part of the brain, of the psyche of fear and trembling and chills and shaking. But most of us don't realize it. Ah, but what is this thing called horror?

Can there be a Mother Time, a Goddess of Death? If so, this Goddess of Death embraced me in her warm folds of time and space, but left me an escape route, a last scream for help. Now, I can never doubt that my death will be real, a physical end to my cherished brain function, and a winding down of all that is my soul, a soule that exists in the minds of loved ones, friends and others.

Lost Carcosa... all death is a neurological condition, an hallucination that becomes so real... and then life fades out, as some place in our brains just shuts off... this thought kills me each time I think of it!

The self: a Lost Carcosa, a once human, a found corpse... naked on a bathroom floor.

Scared the life out of me... almost! But I lived!

Re: The horror & macabre genre

WOw. Autonomic dysreflexia... I looked it up. Scarier than any literature I can think of, that's for sure! I empathize with you Max, I just wonder if you should be thinking such morbid thoughts at this juncture? Or maybe it helps? I dunno. It's all fine and good for me to be exploring my demons while in a relatively hale state. Kinda like rooting on a boxer to take a beating and go the distance without any actual skin in the game. Although, one time I caught spinal meningitis and thought I was gonna die. Three days of pukey headaches, couldn't get out of bed, refused to go the hospital. No syncope or profound hallucinations, though. Just unrelenting pain. I just might've died if my girlfriend, god bless her, hadn't dragged me like a sack of apples to the hospital. She pretty much saved my life.

Re: The horror & macabre genre

John Hamler wrote:

WOw. Autonomic dysreflexia... I looked it up. Scarier than any literature I can think of, that's for sure! I empathize with you Max, I just wonder if you should be thinking such morbid thoughts at this juncture? Or maybe it helps? I dunno. It's all fine and good for me to be exploring my demons while in a relatively hale state. Kinda like rooting on a boxer to take a beating and go the distance without any actual skin in the game. Although, one time I caught spinal meningitis and thought I was gonna die. Three days of pukey headaches, couldn't get out of bed, refused to go the hospital. No syncope or profound hallucinations, though. Just unrelenting pain. I just might've died if my girlfriend, god bless her, hadn't dragged me like a sack of apples to the hospital. She pretty much saved my life.

My WIP is all about "thinking such thoughts at this juncture". A chronic disease (like death itself) can't be denied, or it becomes a constant fight for happiness and life. Acceptance of the inevitable allows room for thoughts of kindness, forgiveness and well-wishing for the world around oneself. However, the memory of things denied are a real kick in the ass when writing, plotting and vengeance (lol).

The fear of actual deterioration of the physical body and death are profound subjects in literature: Frankenstein, Dracula, The Mummy, the" 72 Virgins" thing in Islam, ghosts turning the screws, etc. I have to admit that writing fiction dealing with the termination of life is in some way macabre to me. The mystery of death and existence has puzzled all philosophers and soothsayers and holy men and lawyers for... well, forever.

More later...

6 (edited by dagnee 2014-11-30 00:04:56)

Re: The horror & macabre genre

Max wrote: The fear of actual deterioration of the physical body and death are profound subjects in literature: Frankenstein, Dracula, The Mummy, the" 72 Virgins" thing in Islam, ghosts turning the screws, etc. I have to admit that writing fiction dealing with the termination of life is in some way macabre to me. The mystery of death and existence has puzzled all philosophers and soothsayers and holy men and lawyers for... well, forever.

While you see those works of fiction as fear of the deterioration of the body, I see them as 'life after death' wishes. Frankenstein, Dracula and the Mummy are all characters who were dead and came back to life. But they all could be stopped, they all could be killed again.

Then there's the character who will not die: the first time I saw 'Halloween', it terrified me. Michael Myers would not die. Just when you think Jamie Lee Curtis finished him off...she looks at the ground where Michael should be lying dead, to find...nothing. AND THAT'S WHERE THE MOVIE ENDED. It still gives me the shivers. 

There's the undead and the never-dead, both of which symbolizes our desire to evade death.

smile

Re: The horror & macabre genre

I DIED A FEW MONTHS BACK... from, can you believe this: constipation. Combine that with low blood pressure at the bottom of the body, and high blood pressure at the top; then I stood up. BAM! I went to the death and falling place. In the ambulance the blood pressure was 50/30. In the ER room they were confounded and unable to rouse me. I was going down for good. And I knew it! A major enema and 23 hours later, I came back.

When falling earlier, I hallucinated the mother of all horror movies. First person present seeing a film of ... I can't explain it!... 10000 words might try to explain it.  I think I saw into an exploding vagus nerve... somehow.

Now I fear constipation as much as I fear guns. You think I kidding, but I am consuming fiber with 100 fl oz of water to fight off this monster daily. I pop stool softeners like candy and I drink super espresso in the a.m. like an Italian.

I'm warming up for writing a horror story using this topic.  It is so unusual ( and real, Anatomic Hyperreflexia)... ooops, gotta go, I really got to go...

Re: The horror & macabre genre

maxkeanu wrote:

I DIED A FEW MONTHS BACK... from, can you believe this: constipation. Combine that with low blood pressure at the bottom of the body, and high blood pressure at the top; then I stood up. BAM! I went to the death and falling place. In the ambulance the blood pressure was 50/30. In the ER room they were confounded and unable to rouse me. I was going down for good. And I knew it! A major enema and 23 hours later, I came back.

When falling earlier, I hallucinated the mother of all horror movies. First person present seeing a film of ... I can't explain it!... 10000 words might try to explain it.  I think I saw into an exploding vagus nerve... somehow.

Now I fear constipation as much as I fear guns. You think I kidding, but I am consuming fiber with 100 fl oz of water to fight off this monster daily. I pop stool softeners like candy and I drink super espresso in the a.m. like an Italian.

I'm warming up for writing a horror story using this topic.  It is so unusual ( and real, Anatomic Hyperreflexia)... ooops, gotta go, I really got to go...

I can relate to your fear of constipation. I had a patient who suffered a blockage that resulted in surgery. From that moment on, they were terrified if they didn't have one BM a day.
Then I had a patient, which I think suffered in a lesser degree from Anatomic Hyperreflexia, if they sat a certain way on the commode they did exactly what you described. I called 911 thinking my patient was dying. By the time EMTs got there my patient had recovered.
I am so sorry you're going through this but I do admire you working through it by channeling your angst into a work of fiction. At any rate TNBW has your back, Max. We're all hoping and in my case, praying, that you'll just keep getting better and better! smile