Topic: Welcome

Welcome to the Cop Shop!  If you're a writer of mystery and crime fiction, this is the place for you to ask your questions or share information with another writer who needs help.  Or if you're a law enforcement professional, let us pick your brain.  Who knows, you might be writing stories of your own after a bit.  I like my doughnuts glazed and my coffee black, how about you?  JP
P.S.  As you join the group, introduce yourself--let us know what you're writing!

Re: Welcome

Hi there.  I don't mind troubleshooting medical problems or questions so your effects can be accurate.  My background is in trauma surgery (I'm not a doc...I'm a PA, but I get to see the gore and I've been doing that for 15 years.  Send a message over if you have any question!

My writing is more about magic.  Like Lord of the Rings but I like to think that my characters are more realistic.  As I do my job, I use unreality as a vent to blow off steam.  However, I'm a resource to you if needed.  Keep me in mind!

A

A

Re: Welcome

Here's a question for you, Amy.  I have been consulting with a former animal control officer about ths one.  I let my hero, Jerry, be bitten by a dog in the first chapter, only to learn that in 1950, there was no testing for rabies.  Can you tell me what the standard treatment for dogbite was at the time?  JP

Re: Welcome

My first thought is that most antibiotics hadn't been developed yet.  Here is a Wiki link for what the timeline is for release of these meds (realizing that small-town hospitals probably wouldn't have the newer released ones)  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_antibiotics

Depending the size of the town, the characters would get oral antibiotics (sulfa or penicillin), the wound would be washed out with tap or sterile water if available, and left open (not sutured) to drain if it got infected.  They would bandage it, obviously.  Honey is a good bacteriostatic that some docs might have been aware of back then, so that might have been put over the wound.  Have the doc comfort the MC with this treatment and just say that 'it works' ('cause it does)

I have a text from 1915 that shows the treatment for all sorts of diseases.  That might be a good resource.  Give me time though.  Its a really big book.

Re: Welcome

I write and read romance, with crime a close second (reading only that is).  If you need a first hand account from someone that's never been arrested or questioned, I'm the go-to person.  smile  I have no law enforcement expertise other than what I've picked up watching Sherlock Holmes and CSI ...  I do like doughnuts and badges though.  Looking forward to reading/reviewing stuff that will make me bite my nails (no pressure!).

Re: Welcome

amy s wrote:

My first thought is that most antibiotics hadn't been developed yet.  Here is a Wiki link for what the timeline is for release of these meds (realizing that small-town hospitals probably wouldn't have the newer released ones)  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_antibiotics

Depending the size of the town, the characters would get oral antibiotics (sulfa or penicillin), the wound would be washed out with tap or sterile water if available, and left open (not sutured) to drain if it got infected.  They would bandage it, obviously.  Honey is a good bacteriostatic that some docs might have been aware of back then, so that might have been put over the wound.  Have the doc comfort the MC with this treatment and just say that 'it works' ('cause it does)

I have a text from 1915 that shows the treatment for all sorts of diseases.  That might be a good resource.  Give me time though.  Its a really big book.

I'm not sure I'm writing this in the right place, but here goes.  I knew you'd have something for me.  I did mention penicillin, but I had the doc stitch up the tear.  I never heard of using honey before--just pour it on the wound?  Just think--only sixty-four years ago, and things seem so primitive!  Thanks for the information.  Just knowing gives me a stronger grip on things.  JP smile

Re: Welcome

You can use honey like a triple antibiotic ointment.  Survival medicine uses it instead of bacitracin.  It isn't better than a triple antibiotic, but it's nearly as good.  That way, if you don't have anyone injure themselves, they can use it on a sandwich toward the end of the hike/ trip and eat it.  To treat, just smear it across the cut like an ointment.

Also, realize that most ER's were staffed by family practice doctors.  Emergency medicine didn't become a specialty until about 1970 (after Vietnam)

Re: Welcome

Thanks, Amy.  Great example of how TNBW works to help/ support writers in need.  JP

Re: Welcome

Hello All! So happy to be here! My novel has characters who are undercover narcotics officers, firemen and EMS. My own profession is in fire/EMS, so if you need any help in that area, I'll be more than happy to oblige. As for my narcs - oh my, the amount of research has been incredible. I can always use help with those two!

Re: Welcome

Hey everyone. I write all kinds of things but my two favorites are romantic suspense and crime fiction. I don't have any particular expertise in the cop shop area but have done a ton of research for all of my novels that I'd be happy to share.  I'm currently working on a crime fiction draft called Sister Margaret's One Big Lie and could always use more eyes on it. Looking forward to this group becoming active!

Re: Welcome

For J. P. In the fifties the dog would have been quarantined and watched for two weeks, I think it was, since the treatment for rabies was two shots in the stomach which hurt like hell. The wound would have been treated as indicated above. BTW, Honey was known to the Egyptians as an antibiotic as well as the Romans and the Moors.
If you have any old police questions, I did twenty years in L. A., ten as a homicide lieutenant. However, things have changes since then, but I've stayed fairly current . I'm happy to help, but it may take a few days to get back to you.

12 (edited by j p lundstrom 2014-11-15 21:45:44)

Re: Welcome

Welcome!  Glad to have you on board.  Sounds like you bring a lot to the group.  Thanks for the info.  In my story, the dog was shot by the owner, so no watching will take place.  What kind of writing do you do?  mysteries, memoirs, humor?
JP

13 (edited by j p lundstrom 2014-11-15 21:53:49)

Re: Welcome

c.e. jones wrote:

Hello All! So happy to be here! My novel has characters who are undercover narcotics officers, firemen and EMS. My own profession is in fire/EMS, so if you need any help in that area, I'll be more than happy to oblige. As for my narcs - oh my, the amount of research has been incredible. I can always use help with those two!

Welcome!  You are going to be in great demand!  I can't believe the research I've been doing for just a small-town cop, including two real cops I've interviewed.  I am not ready to attempt anything so high-powered as yours.  More power to you.  JP

Re: Welcome

Is anyone writing about law enforcement in the old west?  How about the FBI?  What other aspects of law enforcement have you delved into?  Post a question, opinion, or answer.  Maybe you'll be inspied to try something new!  JP

Re: Welcome

Glad to be on board. I have been a cop for most of my working life, retired now. My experiences span everything from working the street in uniform, being a detective, moving into supervision then mid and upper level management. My career ended as the Chief Deputy of a Texas sheriff's department in the Dallas-Ft Worth metroplex area. I then started working for the U.S. Dept of Justice and they sent me to Bosnia for five years to train local officers and the international police who were present during the re-building of the infra-structure after the war.

I'm open to questions and more than happy to lend any help I can to anyone needing it. I continue to struggle with writing in a manner that someone will read and enjoy. I've posted and taken down a couple of stories - they stunk! After six months of trying to learn the craft I am about to re-post one of them. It will be under Historical Fiction. The title is Virgil’s Path; Threads of Life and Death in Oklahoma. It's actually a fictionalized autobiography, but there's not really a place for that. Hope someone reads it.
Allen L

Re: Welcome

Allen, I'm glad to read your material no matter what the level of your writing.  My stuff sucked until I joined this site.  When I started posting, my learning curve drastically improved.  You need to post and start opening yourself to well-intentioned nitpicking.  It's the only way to get better.  I'll also re-read after revisions so you can get a perspective on where you've improved.

Kind of like target practice at the range.  You can't get better aim until you shoot the gun :-)  Six months between attempts is wayyyyy too long!

Re: Welcome

Hello to everyone. Sorry I introduced myself in the wrong group. I'm currently writing a mystery/suspense/love story and hope to turn it into a series the detectives name is Adam Potter and the book is call Harlequin.

Re: Welcome

Welcome DD. Sounds like you need to market the book as romantic suspense. That's my main genre.

Re: Welcome

Hi e'one! Mike Jackson here. I've been away from this site, but now I'm back to stay. Hopefully. I'll be asking questions far more than offering opinions or speculation, in Cop Shop.

Mike

Re: Welcome

Mike - Glad to have you on board. You say you are 'back', which made me look at your portfolio to see what you've posted. I only found two items, both posted today. One was simply a 'test' post, the other a short story called 'Him'. I tried to open it but got the following message:
"Not Authorized
Please connect with mikejackson1127 using the Connect button on their profile page to gain access to this content."
Do you intentionally have it blocked or restricted on who can read it, or is that a glitch?
One last question. Your profile page says you've been a member since March 2013. I would almost bet money I've read your work but can't find any trace of it, even on the old site ( http://old.thenextbigwriter.com/index.html ). What happened to your stuff, or am I delusional?
Allen

Re: Welcome

Glad to have you, Mike.

Re: Welcome

R. M. Keegan wrote:

For J. P. In the fifties the dog would have been quarantined and watched for two weeks, I think it was, since the treatment for rabies was two shots in the stomach which hurt like hell. The wound would have been treated as indicated above. BTW, Honey was known to the Egyptians as an antibiotic as well as the Romans and the Moors.
If you have any old police questions, I did twenty years in L. A., ten as a homicide lieutenant. However, things have changes since then, but I've stayed fairly current . I'm happy to help, but it may take a few days to get back to you.

Hey, R. M.--I just found your information about the dog/rabies situation in the fifties.  The dog is dead, his owner put him down, deafening the cop temporarily, so, no quarantine.  My best research says 21 shots in 1950, and I'm so old, I remember a playground exchange wherein somebody's uncle/cousin? had the series.  Scared us kids all to hell.  This was in Pico (before it became Pico-Rivera) when we were surrounded on all sides by orange groves, and we went to school with black noses from breathing in the smudge pot smoke, and the river still had water in it, though not much.   You probably know the place.  JP

Re: Welcome

Thanks, Janet!

Re: Welcome

Oh, Wow. Sorry 'bout that, Allen. I'm very much behind in learning how to use this new system, lol. I'm going to try and fix that problem. Thanks much for bringing that up!

I took all my stuff off the old site, thinking that if and when I came back, I'd just start with brand new stuff. I'll probably restore some of it.

Peace,

Mike

Re: Welcome

Hey Allen, I think I've solved the problem regarding being able to access my work. I don't want to say I've definitely solved it, due to my slow grasp of this new system, lol.

Mike